Audiology

AUDIOLOGY

ACTIV-EARS Audiology was established to provide high quality audiological services and products to adults and school aged children living in the in the inner northern suburbs of Brisbane.

 

ACTIV-EARS Audiology is a family company, is independently owned and locally operated with a permanent clinic situated in Everton Park, with visiting clinics located in Bongaree Bribie Island and Meadowbrook. ACTIV-EARS Audiology is not affiliated with any hearing aid manufacturer, giving you the client a wider choice of device. ACTIV-EARS is owned and managed by Audiologist Director Paul Bunn. Together with our experienced administration staff, we focus on providing a leading diagnostic and rehabilitation hearing service. With quality-timed appointments, frequency of service, diagnostic evaluation together with clinician continuity, at ACTIV-EARS Audiology we believe we can provide a better service without the constraints, decisions, appointment time restrictions and sales targets required by a large multi-national company.

Hearing Assesments or Hearing Screens

Hearing Assessments or Hearing Screens

The difference between hearing screening and hearing evaluation can sometimes be confusing. Here we explain the differences.

Hearing Screen
A hearing screening is usually a preliminary step in which an individual’s hearing is checked to see if further evaluation is required. In other words, hearing screening is a quick and cost-effective way to separate people into two groups: a pass group and a fail group. Those who pass hearing screenings are presumed to have no hearing loss. Those who fail are in need of more detailed hearing evaluation by a qualified audiologist. It is recommended that all hearing screening programs be conducted under the supervision of an audiologist holding the ASA Certificate of Clinical Practice (CCP).

Hearing Assessment
On your first visit to ACTIV-EARS Audiology, your audiologist will start by asking you questions about your medical and hearing history. This is called the case history. Next, the audiologist will look into your ears using a light, called an otoscope, and check for anything in the ear canal that might affect the test results or require referral to your doctor.

Finally, your activ-ears audiologist will conduct a test or series of tests to assess:
• Whether there is a hearing loss
• The cause of the hearing loss (to the extent possible)
• The degree and configuration (one or both ears?) of hearing loss
• The best treatment options
The hearing assessment is an in-depth assessment of an individual’s hearing by an audiologist. The purpose of this evaluation is to determine the nature and degree of the hearing loss and the best treatment options. At ACTIV-EARS Audiology, we use a number of different tests in this evaluation.

Audiological Assessment

Audiological Assessment

Pure-Tone Testing
A pure-tone air conduction hearing test determines the faintest tones a person can hear at selected pitches (frequencies), from low to high. During this test, earphones are worn so that information can be obtained for each ear.

Speech Testing
The audiologist will also conduct tests of listening and speech. These results are also recorded on the audiogram. One test that the audiologist conducts during a hearing test is the speech reception threshold (SRT).

Middle-Ear Testing
The audiologist may also take measurements that will provide information about how the middle ear is functioning. These measurements include tympanometry, acoustic reflex measures, and static acoustic measures. This type of testing is particularly important in preschool children (ages 3–5), for whom hearing loss is more often associated with middle ear disease.

Tympanometry assists in the detection of fluid in the middle ear, perforation of the eardrum, or wax blocking the ear canal. Tympanometry pushes air pressure into the ear canal, making the eardrum move back and forth. The test measures the mobility of the eardrum. Graphs are created, called tympanograms. These can reveal a stiff eardrum, a hole in the eardrum, or an eardrum that moves too much. The tympanogram is often recorded when children have middle ear infections.

Acoustic reflex measures add information about the possible location of the hearing problem. Everyone has an acoustic reflex to sounds. A tiny muscle in the middle ear contracts when a loud sound occurs. The loudness level at which the acoustic reflex occurs—or the absence of the acoustic reflex—gives information to the audiologist about the type of hearing loss.

Static acoustic impedance measures the physical volume of air in the ear canal. This test is useful in identifying a perforated eardrum or checking the openness of ventilation tubes.

After the test battery is completed, the audiologist will review with you each component of the audiologic evaluation to obtain a profile of hearing abilities and needs. Additional specialized testing may be indicated and recommended based on these initial test results. The hearing evaluation may result in recommendations related to:
• Further follow-up such as medical referral
• Educational referral
• Hearing aid/sensory aid assessment
• Assessment for assistive listening devices
• Hearing rehabilitation assessment
• Speech and language assessment and/or counseling

Otoacoustic Emissions (OAEs)
Otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) are sounds given off by the inner ear when the cochlea is stimulated by a sound. When sound stimulates the cochlea, the outer hair cells vibrate. The vibration produces a nearly inaudible sound that echoes back into the middle ear. The sound can be measured with a small probe inserted into the ear canal.
People with normal hearing produce emissions. Those with hearing loss greater than 25–30 decibels (dB) do not produce these very soft sounds. The OAE test is often part of a newborn hearing screening program. This test can detect blockage in the outer ear canal, as well as the presence of middle ear fluid and damage to the outer hair cells in the cochlea.

 

“As you can see, an audiological evaluation is much more than “just a hearing test!”

Audiology Services

Audiological Services

Custom-fit hearing solutions: independent and individualised advice about the latest hearing aid technologies and styles, including near invisible hearing devices.

Repairs and aid adjustments: Earmoulds, fast hearing aid diagnosis, repairs and aid adjustments to meet individual needs.

Onsite education: free advice on strategies and training for coping with hearing loss and using corrective and assistive technology.

WorkCover accredited Audiologist – QLD, NSW.

Office of Hearing Services accredited audiologist, provision of free hearing aids[+topup devices] to eligible pensioners.

Office of Hearing Services accredited audiologist, provision of hearing services to war veteran/DVA clients.

Occupational Health and Safety Hearing Assessments: as part of a comprehensive hearing conservation program.

Swimming, Noise, Sleeping and Musician earplugs: to protect your ears.

Pediatric Assessment

Child Assessment
Hearing difficulties can significantly affect a child’s ability to learn. Children with hearing loss may experience speech and language delays, educational difficulties, and behavioural problems and often require increased educational support. Early intervention can enhance a child’s overall speech and language development and educational outcomes.

ACTIV-EARS Audiology provides the following paediatric services:

Hearing Assessments: comprehensive assessments for 3.5+Y.O. through to school-aged children
• Pure-Tone Testing
• Speech Testing [School age]
• Middle-ear Testing
- Tympanometry
- Acoustic Reflex measures
• Otoacoustic Emissions (OAEs)

After the test battery is completed, the audiologist will review with you each component of the audiological evaluation to obtain a profile of hearing abilities and needs. Additional specialized testing may be indicated and recommended based on these initial test results.

FM Fittings: specialised equipment to assist hearing-impaired children in classroom settings

Swimming earplugs and musician plugs: to protect your child’s ears

School Hearing Screening Service for schools and colleges: our program is conducted within the school facility during school hours and is generally offered to children from Prep to Early Primary. Children in older grades are also screened if requested/required.

Audiological Assessment

Pure-Tone Testing
A pure-tone air conduction hearing test determines the faintest tones a person can hear at selected pitches (frequencies), from low to high. During this test, earphones are worn so that information can be obtained for each ear.

Speech Testing
The audiologist will also conduct tests of listening and speech. These results are also recorded on the audiogram. One test that the audiologist conducts during a hearing test is the speech reception threshold (SRT).

Middle-Ear Testing
The audiologist may also take measurements that will provide information about how the middle ear is functioning. These measurements include tympanometry, acoustic reflex measures, and static acoustic measures. This type of testing is particularly important in preschool children (ages 3–5), for whom hearing loss is more often associated with middle ear disease.

Tympanometry assists in the detection of fluid in the middle ear, perforation of the eardrum, or wax blocking the ear canal. Tympanometry pushes air pressure into the ear canal, making the eardrum move back and forth. The test measures the mobility of the eardrum. Graphs are created, called tympanograms. These can reveal a stiff eardrum, a hole in the eardrum, or an eardrum that moves too much. The tympanogram is often recorded when children have middle ear infections.

Acoustic reflex measures add information about the possible location of the hearing problem. Everyone has an acoustic reflex to sounds. A tiny muscle in the middle ear contracts when a loud sound occurs. The loudness level at which the acoustic reflex occurs—or the absence of the acoustic reflex—gives information to the audiologist about the type of hearing loss.

Static acoustic impedance measures the physical volume of air in the ear canal. This test is useful in identifying a perforated eardrum or checking the openness of ventilation tubes.

After the test battery is completed, the audiologist will review with you each component of the audiologic evaluation to obtain a profile of hearing abilities and needs. Additional specialized testing may be indicated and recommended based on these initial test results. The hearing evaluation may result in recommendations related to:
• Further follow-up such as medical referral
• Educational referral
• Hearing aid/sensory aid assessment
• Assessment for assistive listening devices
• Hearing rehabilitation assessment
• Speech and language assessment and/or counseling

Otoacoustic Emissions (OAEs)
Otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) are sounds given off by the inner ear when the cochlea is stimulated by a sound. When sound stimulates the cochlea, the outer hair cells vibrate. The vibration produces a nearly inaudible sound that echoes back into the middle ear. The sound can be measured with a small probe inserted into the ear canal.
People with normal hearing produce emissions. Those with hearing loss greater than 25–30 decibels (dB) do not produce these very soft sounds. The OAE test is often part of a newborn hearing screening program. This test can detect blockage in the outer ear canal, as well as the presence of middle ear fluid and damage to the outer hair cells in the cochlea.

Government Services

takethefirststepwithahearingsolution

FREE to Client Services for Eligible Pensioners & Veterans

ACTIV-EARS Audiology also provides services to eligible voucher clients approved by the Office of Hearing Services. These services include provision of hearing assessments, the cost of pre-approved hearing instruments / assistive listening devices and their fitting, contribution to the ongoing maintenance and repair of hearing devices.

To be eligible for subsidised hearing rehabilitation services through the Commonwealth Government you must be an Australian Citizen or Permanent Resident aged 27 years or older and be:
• A Pensioner Concession Card holder;
• receiving Sickness Allowance from Centrelink;
• the holder of a Gold Repatriation Health Card (DVA) issued for all conditions;
• the holder of a White Repatriation Health Card (DVA) issued for conditions that include hearing loss;
• a dependent of a person in one of the above categories;
• a member of the Australian Defence Force; or
• undergoing an Australian Government funded vocational rehabilitation service and you are referred by your service provider
• Pensioners and War Veterans
• Information for pensioners and war veterans about the services offered at active-ears through the Offices of Hearing Services with links.

ACTIV-EARS is accredited to provide free hearing evaluation services to pensioners and war veterans (DVA cardholders) under the Australian Government Hearing Services Program. ACTIV-EARS provides hearing aids and assistive technologies for pensioners and war veterans.

How to apply for this program:
• 1. A Medical certificate is available from ACTIV-EARS or download it HERE.
• 2. Take it to your doctor to sign and authorize.
• 3. Return it to us, and we will add you to the Office of Hearing Services and print your voucher, so you can attain FREE services.

Eligibility for hearing services from the federal government can be found on the Office of Hearing Services website. HERE.

ACTIV-EARS Audiology is accredited to provide free hearing evaluation services to pensioners and war veterans (DVA cardholders) under the Australian Government Hearing Services Program. ACTIV-EARS Audiology provides hearing aids and assistive technologies for pensioners and war veterans.

How to apply for this program:
1. A Medical certificate is available from ACTIV-EARS Audiology or download it HERE.
2. Take it to your doctor to sign and authorize.
3. Return it to us, and we will add you to the Office of Hearing Services and print your voucher, so you can attain FREE services.

Eligibility criteria for hearing services from the federal government can be found on the Office of Hearing Services website.The website is http://www.hearingservices.gov.au/wps/portal/hso/site/eligibility/programhelp/eligibility/

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